Horrornews.net Reviews ‘The Devil’s Ground’

SYNOPSIS: Carrie Mitchell (Daryl Hannah) is en route to her new life in Salem, Maine. After stopping at a lonely gas bar, she has a rather strange conversation with a hulking gas station attendant in which he warns her that the roads are bad, but she continues on towards her destination. Suddenly, from out of the woods staggers AMY SINGER, injured and scared! Carrie pulls over to help, and her young passenger begins to tell Carrie a horrifying story of what befell her and her friends in the woods. Through a series of flashbacks we witness the horrific events of Amy and her colleagues who days earlier were out on an environmental studies trip for college. They were camped in the forest excavating what they believed was an ancient Indian burial site, and they unearth arrowheads, and native artifacts which lead to ancient bone fragments, when they then find an arm bone, with a Rolex watch still attached around the wrist, It suddenly dawns on the group that they have discovered a burial ground, but not the type they were seeking! REVIEW: Upon first watch you probably will say to yourself, haven’t I seen this film before? That’s because it starts very much like a dozen other films I’ve seen. Most recently, “Dying Breed” but there are others as well. Though don’t give up hope as there some good things coming. Our scenario is much like we’ve heard before. A group of smart college kids head up to the back roads out on an excursion. This time the kids are environmentalists. As they head on there road trip filled...

Lovehorror.co.uk Sits Down With Producer and Editor of ‘Fallow Field’ Colin Arnold

The Fallow Field is a low budget chiller written and directed by Leigh Dovey. It yet again proves that we are in the midst of a resurgence in British horror and we were lucky enough to talk to the producer and editor of the movie, Colin Arnold, to find out more about taking the film from page to screen and more. Love Horror: How did you get involved in filmmaking? Colin Arnold: I studied a BSc in Film Production Technology at Staffordshire University and trained at Reuters News Agency in London as producer, sound & camera operator interviewing the likes of Steven Spielberg, Tony Blair and Bernie Ecclestone. Following Reuters I joined design agency Flaming Pear producing over a hundred promos and commercials. After directing and editing my first music feature documentary in 2007 GUILFEST: GRASS ROOTS. Leigh Dovey handed me the script of The Fallow Field at the British Film Institute, I immediately attached as producer and editor. Love Horror: How did you meet Leigh? And how did The Fallow Field come to be created? Colin Arnold: Leigh and I were introduced to each other through a mutual friend, writer and director Stephen Ellis at the Cannes Film Festival back in 2005. We immediately clicked and shared similar tastes in good films and red wine. Following the festival we went our separate ways for a few years– I went off to direct a feature length music documentary, Leigh continued writing and 3 years after that we had a meeting at the BFI Southbank bar. Leigh handed me the script for The Fallow Field. He was going to direct it and...

Starburst Magazine Reviews ‘The Fallow Field’

After struggling to find distribution (like so many indie horror films) for over three years, Monster Pictures have finally taken a punt on Leigh Dovey’s throwback to 1970s British rural horror, and good on them for doing so. With other recent releases like Scott Leberecht’s excellent Midnight Son, Monster Pictures are slowly building themselves as a force to be reckoned with as a distributor of quality indie horror. When amnesiac Matt (Garry) wakes up in the middle of the wilderness with no recollection of the past seven days, he retraces his steps to a remote farmed owned by the brutal Calham (Dacre), a sadist who likes to abduct his victims and subject them to torture in the shed of his farm. Matt finds himself a victim to Calham’s twisted games – but things are not quite what they seem and there is more to Matt’s predicament than anyone could have known except Calham. Meanwhile, the fallow field where Calham’s buries his bodies yields a strange and terrible secret. Billed as a cross between Wolf Creek and Memento, The Fallow Field also owes more than a little to British rural folk-horror films of the 1970s, such as The Wicker Man and Blood on Satan’s Claw. In this case the countryside that provides the setting The Fallow Field becomes more than just a backdrop to the story, but a character in itself. It’s this twist that makes The Fallow Field all the more memorable, taking it beyond the Switchblade Romance-type story it at first appears to be into something more mystical and M.R. James-like. This genre-bending could have been unconvincing but The Fallow Fieldbenefits from strong direction by Leigh Dovey and good performances by Dacre and...

Sci Fi Now Reviews ‘The Fallow Field’

It can seem like there are limited choices for first-time horror filmmakers. You can go with zombies, because everyone loves zombies. Found-footage might be a good way to mask your lack of budget. And then there’s the torture route, because it’s cheap and will appeal to the gore hounds. With its remote farmhouse setting and the poster’s comparison to Greg Mclean’s gruelling Wolf Creek, The Fallow Field looks like it’s going to take the third option. But this debut from writer/director Leigh Dovey uses a familiar setting to tell a beguilingly gruesome tale. Matt (Steve Garry) has woken up in the countryside with no memory of how he got there and it’s not the first time this has happened. Determined to find out why he is so drawn to a particular farmhouse, he finds himself in the clutches of killer farmer Calham (Michael Dacre) and discovers what the local soil yields. While the first 20 minutes appear to be sowing the seeds of home improvement tool misuse, Dovey plays his trump card towards the end of the first act and allows a restrained but decidedly unsettling two-hander to play out at its own pace. Rather than taking the Texas Chain Saw Massacre route, the film turns into a nasty morality play. The power of Calham’s land allows him to justify his murders as victimless crimes. Will Matt come around to his captor’s way of thinking? The Fallow Field occasionally stretches itself a little too far and a couple of scenes could have been trimmed, but it’s a well-written and atmospheric two-hander in which the familiar ‘staring-into-the-abyss’ conundrum is given a neat twist. The film’s been promoted...

Zombiehamster.com Reviews ‘The Fallow Field’

The Fallow Field is a new British horror from writer / director Leigh Dovey. Channeling classic British features from many genres, the reviews and reception have been incredibly strong so far. Colin McCracken spoke with director Leigh Dovey about the film, which is soon to be released from Monster Pictures UK.  Disorientated and lost, Matt Sadler’s (Steve Garry) life is falling apart. His relationship deteriorates within the first few minutes of the movie and it doesn’t take long to establish that this is only one of many challenging and difficult things which he is currently experiencing. Suffering from extensive blackouts and disappearing for significant amounts of time, of which he retains no subsequent memory, he decides to take a drive to clear his head. Walking through a local farm, set within the remote, yet picturesque locale, Matt chances upon a sullen, yet not entirely formidable character by the name of Calham (Michael Dacre). He stops at Calham’s farmhouse for tea, under the impression that he will receive some assistance with his car, which has broken down nearby. A sequence of violent and unpredictable events lead to Matt becoming a prisoner within a very peculiar and dangerous world. Calham’s motives and story are revealed along the way, which only serve to heighten the dread that is created within the idyllic English countryside setting. A staggeringly good independent feature which is reminiscent of the great ‘70s British chillers, The Fallow Field has a great deal to offer. Refreshing in terms of story and style, with great central performances and solid direction from Dovey. It is a wonderful, creative affair which makes...