“Highly enjoyable” says The Mind Reels about ‘The Birder’

“The 2014 Canadian Film Fest continues tonight with more screenings, first up is Ted Bezaire’s comedy, The Birder, which is preceded by the hilarious short, The Golden Ticket from Patrick Hagarty. Hagarty’s short is highly enjoyable, it seems Bradley Moore (Michal Grajewski) is having a very bad day. His girlfriend (Melanie Scofano) is leaving him for a hockey player (Bitten’s Steve Lund), he’s being evicted by his landlord (Kris Siddiqi), and he’s just been fired from his job. As he lets loose his anger, he’s met by a mysterious man (Carlo Rota – who has the best delivery and speaking voice, possibly EVER), who offers him a golden ticket that will let him do anything he likes for 24 hours without repercussions. Bradley snatches the opportunity and off he goes! Getting even with those around him, and doing everything he always wanted to… but what happens when the 24 hours are up? A fast-moving and very funny story that makes us ask ourselves why we aren’t seizing our lives like this everyday. Grajewski is hilarious playing the right amount of humor in pathos in the situation, and some of the lines are simply brilliant! I laughed a lot!! This one is a great start to the evening! The Birder, the feature paired with The Golden Ticket, is a gentle and humorous tale that features a great performance by Tom Cavanagh. He play Ron Spencer, a high school teacher with a passion for Ornithology. He has a daughter, Samantha (Cassidy Renee), who idolizes him and shares his love for birds. They are both convinced that we will be named the new Head of Ornithology at...

The Arts Guild Reviews ‘The Birder’

“The film depicts several relationships, including those based on romance, family, and friendship, and the diverse stories intertwine in a very satisfying manner. The acting in this film is relatively strong, including a noteworthy debut performance by Cassidy Renée as Ron’s bird enthusiast daughterSamantha, and a unique score adds to the viewing experience. The Birder is a surprisingly sweet and sensitive comedy full of charm and heart, and although it may be predictable, it is still refreshing to see such a well-meaning film created these days.” Read more at The Arts Guild! Source: The Arts Guild by Talia...

Canadian Film Fest Reviews ‘The Birder’

“High school teacher, and lifelong birder Ron Spencer (Tom Cavanagh), is preparing for his new job as Head of Ornithology at the National Park. He’s been waiting for years to get the position, but finds out that the much younger, and more hip, Floyd Hawkins (Jamie Spilchuk) will be taking over the job in order to attract a younger audience to bird watching. Ron’s daughter, Samantha (Cassidy Renee), is also an avid birdwatcher, but thinks her dad needs to be more in touch with the modern technology of bird watching. Feeling as if he’s losing his daughter, as well as his job, Ron sets out to bring Floyd down. With help from slacker Ben (Mark Rendall), who also hates Floyd after he begins seeing Ben’s ex-girlfriend, the two men try their best to ruin Floyd, with predictably terrible results. The Birder is a sweet, hilarious film, which is so successful due to the performances of Cavanagh and Rendall. As two lovable dorks, it’s impossible to not root for them. Their mission is filled with evil promise, but the way they go about it is anything but. Ron is such a timid man (refusing to even swear) that his plans usually involve trying to prove that Floyd isn’t following the ethical rules of birding. It’s so ridiculous, that even if he succeeded, it wouldn’t hurt Floyd’s reputation. The greatest aspect of the film is how the characters are treated. Nobody is ever made fun of, even if their idea of a good time seems rather nerdy. They all take pride in their pastime, whether it would be cool or not. It’s...

Dread Central Reviews ‘Nightmare Box’

You can sum up Jon Keeyes’ UK indie, Nightmare Box, in one word…unique. However, I’ll elaborate a bit more for those demanding readers that want more out of their movie reviews. The entire film takes place in one surreal room which our unnamed heroine (let’s call her Jane Doe) finds herself trapped. She wakes in this room, which is adorned with everything from giant skulls to Barbie dolls dressed in S&M attire set up in sexual position and can’t remember who she is or how she got there. And that’s the mystery of Nightmare Box. Figure out just what the hell is going on. Now Jane is not alone in this room. That wouldn’t make for much of a movie, would it? She is constantly visited by an eclectic group of characters that can somehow come and go from the room while she remains trapped. There is a young girl, an eyeless girl, a kindly older gentleman, a bible-thumping Puritan and a man with his lips sewn together who keeps silently offering Jane a gun. And then there are the antagonists, a man and woman who come and go and do all sorts of cruel things to poor Jane. But as you watch the film, the scenes jump quickly. One moment you’ll be watching Jane interacting with the eyeless girl and things will be getting heated, then suddenly she wakes up and she’s back in her bed again. Or she’ll be getting abused by the man and woman, then suddenly she wakes up and she’s in the bed again. And this goes on and on for the first 35 or 40...